Friday, July 26, 2013

Previous Endangered Sites- Talbot Hall

The unsuspecting traveler through a suburban Norfolk neighborhood might be surprised to find Solomon Talbot’s 1803, two-and-half-storied Federal style house sitting on the banks of the Lafayette River.  But Norfolk residents and members of the Diocese of Episcopal Southern Virginia have long treasured the quiet setting for contemplation and reflection.
The Talbot Hall Foundation nominated the house and grounds when the Diocese of Southern Virginia announced plans to consider the sale of the property.  While Preservation Virginia took no position on where the Diocesan offices or bishop’s residence should be, we did encourage stewardship of the historic property.

Once part of a 2000 acre farm, the house and its lush grounds have provided a retreat from the bustle of Norfolk.  As the Talbot family home, the house survived the events of the War of 1812 and the Civil War, as well as the end of racial discrimination and the transition from farmland to suburbia.    A bas-relief of the Federal Seal adorns the parlor wall over the fireplace, and a large porch with Doric columns catch the afternoon breezes along the Lafayette River.  The riverside lawn is shaded by a group of specimen trees—each selected and planted to frame the river view from the house.    The Talbot family gave Talbot Hall in 1954 to be the official residence of the Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Southern Virginia and the Diocesan offices.
So what has happened since May 2012?  After the Church’s governing board commissioned a study in December and engaged Harvey Lindsey Corporate Real Estate Services to sell the property. Listed at $4.25 million, the Talbot Hall Foundation continues in their efforts to persuade the Diocese to protect the property.  Our advice remains the same to the Diocese:

·        List the house on the National Register of Historic Places and the Virginia Landmarks Register and
·        Donate historic and land conservation easements to protect the house and the viewshed. 

If those steps are taken, then Talbot Hall will survive for another 210 years and the historic landscape will be preserved.

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Previous Endangered Sites- Zirkle Mill

The town of Forestville, located in the lower portion of Shenandoah County, is distinguished by its sense of community and its sense of history.  In 2005 that continuity was threatened when the Frontier Culture Museum had its eye on Zirkle Mill.  The plan was to move Zirkle Mill to Staunton where it would be the centerpiece of their 1850s industrial exhibit. 

Rob Andrews and Sherryl Andrews Belinsky formed the Save the Zirkle Mill Foundation and nominated Zirkle Mill to the 2005 Virginia’s Most Endangered List. With perseverance, resourcefulness and a “can do” attitude, these descendants of the original Mill owners brought their fight to Governor Warner and succeeded in acquiring the Mill.  Now they are balancing the competing needs of restoring the Mill and providing educational programming. 

As Preservation Virginia continues to re-visit past endangered sites listings, seeking status updates and checking in with those preservationists familiar with past listed sites and the work required to save them, we hope to share words of advice and support for others.  Rob’s advice to endangered site supporters is similar to his approach to saving and preserving the Mill, that is, straightforward:  Educate yourself, have a plan, and stick to it.  Rob said, “This is important in overcoming almost every objection to a preservation project, especially questions like “where does the money come from?”  The major concern [the previous owner] had about sale of the Mill was where the money was to come from to protect it.”  He went on to say, “The Endangered Sites List should be used as a reinforcement of the preservation effort and as a trump card in difficult situations.  Use it only as needed.”

Rob and his sister continue to pursue the preservation of Zirkle Mill and they took their own advice about educate themselves in restoration methods, techniques, and processes.  Rob acknowledges the hard work involved and the tendency to want to find short cuts.  He cautions to “avoid the easy way out” and stay the course.  Today, Zirkle Mill is saved and has a preservation plan.  The Mill is open for group tours and special events.  To learn more about Zirkle Mill visit: